A herd of teal deer
Legend of Korra | Book 4: Balance

steinbecks:

  1. THEY GAVE KORRA A STATUE WHICH SHE RIGHTFULLY DESERVES
  2. IKKI HAS A FIRE FERRET, JINORA’S HAIR GREW BACK, BABY ROHAN HAS HAIR, WINGSUITS!!!
  3. ASAMI’S ‘HOW DARE YOU SPEAK TO ME’ FACE
  4. MAKO SENDING PRINCE WU PACKING BECAUSE HE CAN’T TAKE ASAMI’S HINT

short hair

ebonynightwriter:

LOK Relationships (Books 1-3)  Korra & Lin 

Her mother Toph taught Avatar Aang how to earthbend, but Chief Lin Beifong didn’t feel any special affection for the reckless new Avatar at first. But now this metal and earthbending police chief sees Korra as a true leader and protector for Republic City and will do her best to support the Avatar when called to action.


book one - leaving home | book three - facing zaheer

book one - leaving home | book three - facing zaheer

desnasbooty:

"The origins of Pai-sho date back over ten thousand years. It is a game of both strategy and chance."

ambelle:

kirasyikumuras:

gayfandomblog:

LoK parallels: I'm here for you.

makorrasami is canon

Threesome is the solution to everything

Korra Week / Day 7: Triumph

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE
By Juliet Kahn
I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.
And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.
Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.
READ MORE

Much of the online chatter over season two was made up of fans (foolishly) bemoaning her actions as ridiculous and frustrating. Of course they were. She’s a 17-year-old god-in-training whose only consistent social interaction has come from her polar bear dog.
*circles in red ink* *triple underlines*

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE

By Juliet Kahn

I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.

READ MORE

Much of the online chatter over season two was made up of fans (foolishly) bemoaning her actions as ridiculous and frustrating. Of course they were. She’s a 17-year-old god-in-training whose only consistent social interaction has come from her polar bear dog.

*circles in red ink* *triple underlines*